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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
. while egyptians are raising their voices two years after rising up against hosni mubarak, in syria, the defiance has not shifted president assad. homs has seen some of the worst fighting. our reporter has returned for this special report. >> some of the heaviest fighting happened here. this neighborhood came to symbolize a brutal conflict. a ferocious government offensive after the opposition, it was an assault on an entire community. after nearly one year, life is slowly returning. rubbish collectors are on the job. a small sign the government is back on the street. some families are starting to come home. how is life here, i asked. could not be better, he replied. he gives an anxious look at the soldiers escorting us. a repair shop is back in business. it is not much of a bicycle, but he makes it work. it is what life is like here. >> services are very good. before, life was more difficult. things are getting better day by day. >> it is still a fragile calm, but good enough for children to play on the street. even they do not take notice when guns go off in the distance. it is pa
in egypt led to the overthrow of hosni mubarak. what impact do you think these protests might have that we're seeing now? >> president morsi and the muslim brotherhood will be nervous about what they have seen today. it is important to say while there is disillusionment, things have not gone as people fought -- thought he debuts ago. the pace of change has not been great. we're talking about a split between the liberals and those in the support the brotherhood on the other. it is the liberals who are mainly taking to the streets today. two years ago, we saw all of egypt coming out onto the streets. another half is sitting at home saying there has been an election. our side won. why are you on the streets? the president says give me time. i have had seven months on the job. people say he has had time. they worry about the agenda being pushed. they do not want the state to be made at the beginning. what is difficult to see is how the two sites will be brought together. neither the authorities nor opposition have come up with a clear vision as to how to do that. >> thank you very much. while
the ministry. >> two years ago, the protests in egypt led to the overthrow of hosni mubarak. what impact do you think these protests might have that we're seeing now? >> president morsi and the muslim brotherhood will be nervous about what they have seen today. it is important to say while there is disillusionment, things have not gone as people fought -- thought he debuts ago. the pace of change has not been great. we're talking about a split between the liberals and those in the support the brotherhood on the other. it is the liberals who are mainly taking to the streets today. two years ago, we saw all of egypt coming out onto the streets. another half is sitting at home saying there has been an election. our side won. why are you on the streets? the president says give me time. i have had seven months on the job. people say he has had time. they worry about the agenda being pushed. they do not want the state to be made at the beginning. what is difficult to see is how the two sites will be brought together. neither the authorities nor opposition have come up with a clear vision as to how to
. that was cairo two years ago. hosni mubarak was in power. in 18 days he would step down. the country has seen very few calm days since. egypt's first ever free election put a president in office who has still not closed the gap between the government and a frustrated local and vocal opposition. the population who want even more change. i want to bring in reza sayah in cairo. take us to the scene in cairo there behind you. i understand that protesters have gathered. there are some police officers that are hurt. this is just in cairo alone. >> reporter: yes, suzanne. there have been clashes here. we don't want to blow things out of proportion. here in cairo the violence has been limited to about two streets. behind us there's a street that leads to the interior ministry and other government buildings. police erected a large barrier. what you have is on one side protesters teenagers throwing rocks and debris over the barrier at police. police responding by firing tear gas. sometimes police themselves throwing rocks at the protesters, which is probably not a strategy you'll find in a police train
hosni mubarak and ushered in a period of political tension. in this latest demonstration, circular leading opposition groups are protest against egypt's current president, mohamed morsi. there tried to force morsi to amend a disputed constitution drafted by his islamic allies. there also demanded freedom of expression and the independence of the judiciary. >> investigators are still trying to figure out what grounded the boeing 677 dream liner fleet around the world. the national transportation safety board has worked with manufacturers in arizona, and running a series of new tests on the airlines battery systems. investigators say, a short circuit and uncontrolled chemical reaction apparently took place in the boeing 787 matter. they're still unsure why it happened. >> to united air lines and scrape to their wings at dulles international airport in virginia. the wheat tip from a flight from brussels made contact with the wing tip of a second plane. that was parked at an adjacent to date. the passengers and crew got off the brussels flight. and no one won board the other plane. no
powerful leaders like egypt's hosni mubarak and libya's moammar gadhafi, and unleashing a flood of illegal weapons. >> when gadhafi was falling, i was there at the time, i had never seen so many weapons in my entire life. and they were just being taken from depots, they were being handed over to militant groups. and then they went all over the region. they went from country to country, and they fell into the hands of militant groups. and this is no longer theoretical. seven americans have been killed, including a u.s. master, just in the last four months. >> call it the downside of the arab spring. revolutions that the u.s. are actively, tacitly supported in places like libya and egypt have left shaking governments in place and more instability to an already volatile region. delaware democratic senator chris coons shares the senate foreign relations subcommittee on africa and he joins me now. senator coons, thank you so much for being on the program. >> thank you, luke. >> i want to ask you, we were very much supportive here in the united states two years ago, on the two-year anniversary o
in a violent start to the second anniversary of the uprigss that tloed ouster of hosni mubarak. the protesters are unhappy with the progress that's been made since the revolution. and this shines a light on the ongoing divide between islamists and their secular opponents. >>> a new threat from north korea. pyongyang threatened to attack south korea if seoul joins in a new round of united nations sanctions. north korea calls the sanctions, quote, a declaration of war. >>> and as if the flu season wasn't enough to worry about, a new strain of the norovirus stomach bug is sweeping through the u.s. and it's nasty with gut-wrenching effects that experts say can be even harder to fight off than the flu. it's also easily spread through touching a contaminated surface or eating food handled by an infected person. >>> sports for disabled students is the focus of a sweeping now policy. the department of education is ordering schools to include disabled students in existing sports programs or create equal alternative options. >>> we're hearing now from the fake girlfriend in the manti te'o hoax. these ar
to the overthrow of mu bar bar hosni mubarak. how much has changed there? we have a reporter live in cairo. can we go back to the live pictures and explain exactly what's going on there? >> reporter: there are clashes taking place. we don't want to blow things out of proportion. this is a street a few blocks away from the square that leads to government buildings. police recollected a concrete barrier on one side. you have young protesters. they look like teenagers throwing rocks over the babarri police. a few blocks from that street, things are very calm. not a lot of people out here. a few hundred. we expect the larger crowds to come after friday prayers which end about an hour and a half from now. it's hard to believe it was two years ago when egyptians started an uprising that toppled former president hosni mubarak, of course that uprising started here in tahrir square. they said enough with hosni mubarak. we want our political freedom. we want jobs, a better way of life. i don't think a lot of people expected hosni mubarak to be toppled. incredibly, he was. however, two years later, not all e
that toppled hosni mubarak. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. what is happening there now? this has been going on all day. what is happening now? >> it is 9:00 p.m. local time, victor, and here in tahrir square we're starting to see some of the protesters leave. there are still several thousand people here, but things relatively calm at this location. however, in other parts of cairo, in other parts of egypt, things seem to be escalating, we're seeing violence in pockets of clashes in the side streets, few blocks away from tahrir square. we're seeing clashes between protesters and police in front of the state tv building here in cairo, several blocks away. we're also seeing clashes, we can also tell you that protesters have blocked off traffic in both directions. the 6th of october bridge, a major bridge over the river. they also blocked off a subway system here near in tahrir square. hard to believe it was two years ago, but an uprising here in egypt eventually toppled then president hosni mubarak, and it started right here in tahrir square this iconic landmark, people gathered and demanded a
anniversary of the uprising that led to the outster of hosni mubarak. now they say that morsi is just one dictator replacing another. >>> and north korea turning its anger toward the south. they warn of what they call physical countermeasures against south korea if they directly participate in u.n. sanctions against the north. they say the u.n. resolution passed earlier this week is equivalent to a declaration of war. >>> we told you about the plan to allow women to combat positions in the military. leon panetta made it official. panetta sang the praises of women who are served, are serving, or paid the ultimate price. up in the next half hour. we'll speak with sfwlnzoe bedele of four women who filed a lawsuit challenging the pentagon policy, and kingsley browne, who wrote "coed combat," a book against women in combat. >>> frightening video. a 1-year-old girl ejected from a car during an icy crash in russia the child laying on the road and a huge semi truck barely misses her. here it is in slow motion. wow. the driver lost control of the suv while trying to pass another car. the child not
of hosni mubarak and an arab spring that inspired hope across the middle east. that hope, though, has given way to utter chaos and deadly violence. so much so that the defense minister there in the new government is today warning that it could lead to the collapse of the state. protesters this time unhappy with the muhammad morsi government have defied a curfew and instead have been fighting openly with police along the famed suez canal. cairo also has erupted into violence. dozens of people have been killed. our ben wedeman is live in cairo for us. this is democracy, and democracy, ben, is not pretty. but at the same time, why is it that we're seeing so much violence instead of a political action to try to change the government that's currently in place? that was elected by them? >> reporter: i think it's important to keep in mind that this is a revolution. revolutions don't last 18 days. they can go on for years. this country was essentially under military rule for about 60 years. therefore, when all the controls go, when people take to the streets and fight against the military and again
. after almost to years after the revolution that swept egypt's hosni mubarak out of power, egyptians are dealing with aftermath of all of that. one thing that has changed more, people have guns. and there is more serious crime. here's ian lee in cairo. s. >> reporter: gunfire outside the presidential palace in cairo last december, a fight between opponents and supporters of morsi. business owner ali witnessed the chaos unfold. reports from that night say both sides were shooting at each other. >> i saw lots of people from the protest side down, lots of injuri injuries. i saw with my own eyes more than six passed away. >> reporter: since the revolution, two years ago, ali is concerned about the security situation. >> i have this gun. this is the one i use, mine on my license. i don't have the shotgun as well. >> reporter: he's not the only one. egypt is awash in guns and egyptian security officials say serious gun crime is on the rise. >> people are eagerly, they want to buy guns due to the political instability that the country's having right now. >> reporter: brothers are among the
spring had just toppled hosni mubarak. however, now it's dismal, dirty, and depressing and i raised the issue with president morsi. >> i was at tahrir square and it was pretty quiet. >> yes, it is. but sometimes the media is exaggerating things. there's competition, also, with tourism in the world. this means it's to try to show as if security in egypt is wrecked, which is not correct. we don't have which is suffering. sometimes. not other times. but the rest of egypt, the rest of cairo is quiet and good. >> if you get this loan from the imf, that will help? kbl that helps. that helps. that doesn't solve the whole problem but it helps. >> what's the most important thing when you come to the united states you would like to hear from the u.s. government? >> the most important thing for me is to have real friendship between egyptians and americans. >> so what does that mean? >> what that means is mutual balance of relationships. mutual benefits. now, i need to acknowledge -- i need expertise in different directions to help. i have resources. now, experience of the united states as far
of the uprising that brought down former president hosni mubarak. seven people killed during those protests. two police officers also killed in a separate incident. the man allegedly behind the manti te'o girlfriend hoax is breaking his silence. fox news. the man has already taped an interview on dr. phil. what was said or when that interview will air. address and cell phone number. a growing number of credit and debt collectors are turning social media to find people who are delinquent on payments. disguised as bikini clad models. post personal information of debt for friends and family to see on your wall. no real laws in place to stop it. how you can protect yourself? an attorney and author of i know how are and i saw what you did social networks and the death of privacy joins us now. lori, nice to see you this morning. >> great to be here. you are right. as we begin to live more of our lives online, debt collectors are looking for us there too. they might pose as a hot "avatar" in second life or as you have pointed out a bikini clad model trying to friend us on facebook. but they are real pr
to death for the riot, and the uprising brought down hosni mubarak. terrible news for taxpayers in illinois, standard & poor's downgrading that state's credit rating from a to a-minus and potential to fall further and last in the united states. and for taxpayers means a 95 million dollar hit to their wallet, ainsley. >> ainsley: thank you, tucker, from fallen sports stars to reality tv. we're living in a world of deception. >> clayton: why is it when lance armstrong, manti te'o caught lying there's so much outrage? and joining us from the fox medical a-team, dr. keith ablow. >> ainsley: hey, dr. ablow. >> clayton: yeah, do we hear-- >> can we hear you? >> i mope you can hear me. >> clayton: nice to see you, doc, early morning and we're getting the audio kinks worked out. let's talk about manti te'o and told them up in high regard and wearing jerseys and holding them up like heroes and a fall from grace, and are we're sort of shocked by it. should we be shocked by it? >> i'm glad we're still shocked by it it, it's more pervasive than ever and a kind of epidemic, we're losing as a culture our
thousands of lives from being massacred and a voice of conscience in calling for president hosni mubarak to step aside and began an orderly and peaceful transition to a democratic political system in egypt. john has been a tireless advocate for the cause of peace in the sudan and south sudan and played an instrumental role in the successful referendum in 2011. john is well known for his bipartisan work with former majority leader bill frist on comprehensive hiv-aids legislation that laid the foundation for the president's emergency plan for aids relief, a program that provides lifesaving treatment for people with hiv-aids and supports broad prevention efforts that saves lives every day. many of you know that john is a tireless and most convincing advocate for addressing global climate change and supporting the transition to a clean energy future. as chairman of the committee on foreign relations, he convened eight major hearings and round tables on climate change and energy security, underscoring their connection to global stability, economic competitive and america's national security.
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)